Anthropomorphism – what it is and the concerns it carries

ricoIt’s a tongue twister but deserves the time it takes to pronounce it. What is it? It is defined as placing human characteristics on animals other than ourselves. This was a hot topic at a recent event I attended. It was also a very eye-opening topic, even for me.

Many people anthropomorphize, myself included. An example of anthropomorphizing would be saying “I need to get home and take care of my boy.” Obviously parrots are not our children. I have been known to make statements like this too. Another example was one I thought about earlier today. I give kisses to them on their beaks as a form of communication of my love to them. This is a common form of communication of our feelings from human to human. In the wild, I’m not sure how common, if at all, parrots touching beaks to one another is a form of affection. Regurgitating from one parrot to another is a sign of courtship and communication. Obviously this would not be the case from human to human. I’m laughing picturing this as I type. It’s a pretty bold visual but it does make a pretty big statement. My point is that different behaviors are very powerful forms of communication within a species.
Another common form of anthropomorphizing would be letting our birds sleep with us under blankets. This is how we as humans commonly sleep. You would not see this with a parrot in the wild. Here’s my point with the concern with anthropomorphizing; dark areas and enclosed spaces for a parrot in the wild usually represents a nesting area. There could be major confusion in the communication with the signals we are giving our parrots. We may think we are showing love and affection the way we would to our child but the way a parrot may see it is totally different. Often times allowing our companion parrots to practice nesting behaviors can lead to serious behavior issues such as plucking, lunging and biting, egg laying which can lead to egg binding, and staying at the bottom of the cage with their tails up in the air. Two total different lines of communication from human to parrot. Are we the ones sending mixed signals by assuming they think the way we do?¬†We can assume and many times I see that assumption confused based on the bird’s body language. Sleeping with our parrots can be very dangerous and fatal to them due to suffocation and rolling over on them.
Do you see my concern here? Parrots are parrots and people are humans. From my perspective, we need to see the importance in the difference between the two because we think different and the different things we do could mean something completely different.
Do I anthropomorphize? Absolutely I do. I think that began with my first parrot when I gave him the name Rico. That in itself is placing a human characteristic on a parrot. Is it hurting my communication with him? Not at all. Not that I can see. Do parrots name each other? I don’t know. I have not studied it but I bet there are certain calls they give to each other that helps them identify one another. That could be a name but it is something unique to them. I just make sure my anthropomorphizing isn’t causing confusion and adding behavior issues or unknown medical concerns to the mix.
Let us know your thoughts on this often unclear topic.

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